Inglourious Basterds

Tarantino brings World War II to an explosive and entirely non-historic end with The Inglourious Basterds. Basically it’s a double story thread – a group of American Jews are behind enemy lines, killing (and scalping – a real yeuch) Nazis. And a Jew who runs a Paris cinema gets a chance to revenge the murder of her family. Neither thread meets or even has an inkling what the other is doing, and only the Nazis themselves provide the common link.

All I can say is check out the performance of Austrian actor Christoph Waltz as the Jew Hunter – a chilling portrayal of how the most civilised country in Europe could produce such urbane brutality. His multi-lingual performance is awesome. Diane Kruger is also extremely good and looks the part, magnificently. Brad Pitt reminded me of George Bush, which is not so good.

A lot of the production took place on the set at Babelsberg Film Studios in Germany – a location allegedly used to create the kind of Nazi propaganda that appears in the film. (Cool thing: you can even order a Tarantino crew jacket here) External scenes were however shot in the town of Bad Schandau in Saxony, a spa town on the Elbe, just 6kms from the Czech border.

By the way, having sat through Tarantino’s (gross, captivating, entertaining) revision of history, I’ve just been reading a George RR Martin short story about time travel and mind-reading in the time of nuclear war that’s set in the Swedish stronghold of Sveaborg during the Finnish war of 1808. Now that’s eclectic.